Becoming a Yoga Therapist

Becoming a Yoga Therapist

Yoga Therapy

Yoga can be therapeutic, yes.  It can also become a detriment or may add additional layers of harm to an already harmed body and mind.  Yoga Therapy integrates many levels of healing from asana (posture), pranayama (breathing techniques), chanting (use of sound vibration), mental focus (meditation, or self reflection), and a very gentle suggestion to learn how to feel the sensations in our body that give subtle messages about what we are in need of.  A regular yoga class can be beneficial for many people, however no two people are the same so when we put 60 people in the same room and teach everyone the same ‘routine’ and other practices, the risk that someone in the room may not be benefitting from the practice is simply higher.  Yoga therapy places emphasis on a more traditional one on one relationship between the practitioner and the yoga therapist giving rise to a more unique and individualized session, increasing the benefits for the practitioner and generating a higher level of healing.  

Lisa Whitmer is now a certified Yoga Therapist and through a highly regarded organization named the International Association for Yoga Therapists (IAYT).  This certification is one of the more rigorous achievements as a yoga teacher because one of the main purposes of IAYT is to continue scientific research in regard to the benefits of yoga and then to further educate healthcare professionals so we, as yoga therapists can be held in the same light as professionals in the world of holistic and alternative medicine. 

To read more about IAYT, please visit their website here:

 http://www.iayt.org